Vick’s return to “his city”


It really speaks to the ignorance of a human if he or she is willing to stand and applaud a man who killed dogs.

It makes it slightly worse when you are wearing a Falcons jersey in the Georgia Dome and applauding the dog-killer who ruined the franchise and the image of your city for a period of time.

Michael Vick will return to Atlanta this weekend as a member of the Philadelphia Eagles to take on the Falcons, and has already assured the media that he will be receiving a standing ovation from the Atlanta crowd.

This is going to get ugly.

Here is exactly what Vick had to say on the situation, undoctored and unedited: “I’m going to get a great reaction from the crowd. It’s going to be a standing ovation. It’s still my city.”

If this is still Michael Vick’s city, then I want a first-class ticket out of here. Send me anywhere.

So why is this man so sure of himself after doing time in a federal prison for dogfighting offenses? Shouldn’t any city with the smallest bit of common sense shun one of the biggest outcasts of society?

Guess not. I mean after all, this is a city who just elected a new mayor who stole his opposition’s signs and then accused the opposition of stealing their own signs on purpose.

Blind following doesn’t even begin to describe what happens in the 404.

For decades, Atlanta has been widely regarded as one of the most lukewarm fanbases in every sport, showing up only when we are sure we have a winner on the field, court or ice. So of all the causes to rally behind, people are going to go out of their way to cheer for a dogkiller?

Again, pure ignorance.

I know that a large group of Falcons fans will also turn out to take the other side; after all, I’m not going to label our entire fanbase as senseless. But instead of booing when he takes the field, try this.

Turn your back and don’t say a word.

Shun the man in “his own city.” For his arrogance, he deserves it.

It’s not like crowd noise is necessary when he’s on the field anyways — he is a nonfactor when he actually plays. The man who declared himself a quarterback (right before he was caught killing dogs) has completed three passes for six yards this season. His rushing totals aren’t much better.

And of course, the starting quarterback of the Eagles, Donovan McNabb, weighed in on the situation as well: “I believe he’ll get a standing ovation. You talk about a guy who for six years or so was the face of that franchise, the guy who led them to an NFC championship (appearance). … The people in the community love him. And I think those are things that you don’t forget.”

I guess the city is suffering from a terrible case of short-term memory loss. We’re going to applaud him for losing an NFC Championship Game while casually forgetting that he killed dogs.

So as you go to the Dome and see the familiar No. 7 running onto the field and are torn as to how you’ll react, just remember everything that happened while he was in a Falcons uniform.

He won a lot of games for us. He lost a lot of games for us. We paid him hundreds of millions of dollars. And then he killed dogs.